Eyjafjallajökull Außprache

Eyjafjallajökull Außprache

Eyjafjallajökull Außprache

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What I hear in all the others is something between Yirkik and Yirkich. Perhaps it's an aspirated T, which English doesn't have at the end of words.

If you were to say, "Aye-yah Fyat-lah Yir-kut," which is easy, you'd be doing a good enough job to be understood by Icelanders.

But there's no way that we English speakers can get those sounds out of the orthography. The spelling messes with our heads and we decide it's unpronounceable.

I noticed msnbc has come up with 'Eyjafjöll Glacier' in place of Eyjafjallajökull. Seems very sensible to me.

In fact, I'm very impressed. It seems they went to the trouble of finding out what the nominative pl. Rural people may say the word a tad more slowly.

But 'the hyper-carefully-articulated performance' sounds unnatural to say the least. Scots Gaelic has preaspirated stops too; basically the consonants written with the symbols p t c are voiceless and preaspirated after a vowel word internally , and post aspirated initially.

The consonants written b d g are in fact voiceless and unaspirated. I don't know all that much about Icelandic but the consonantal system seems to be pretty similar in this respect.

Given the high degree of contact in mediaeval times between the Gaels and the Norsemen to say nothing of the high contribution of Gaels to the Icelandic settler population this might well be more than coincidence.

It may indeed be worth learning to say the name. The micro-particles of ash up in the jet stream could stay aloft for years and continue to hazard air transport, which didn't exist when Krakatoa blew.

The lateral affricates are pretty obvious to my ear. Apologies to Robert T. McQuaid, who suggested Eyajfjalla Glacier before I suggested something almost identical.

Suzanne, urban Dublin speech often shows similar effects parodied by fictional character Ross O'Carroll Kelly when he has working class Dubliners pronounce the name of the "Herald" as "Heddild".

And, of course, in the Viking era Dublin was an important Viking kingdom with strong links to York. All very speculative, but it's fun to speculate.

I can't think of counterexamples. I had been saying it "Ay-ya-fyall-uh-yikool". I'm glad to know the correct pronunciation although I can't quite get my tongue around it.

It sounds to me like "kuts" or "kutsch" in the last syllable in the recordings from the native Icelanders, so it must be an aspirated t.

This seems to be pronounced as a [t] with a lateral i. I'm glad we've given them something to laugh about.

They can laugh about our pronunciation while we laugh about their banking system. Dierk: "completely meaningless and unimportant 'news' … Stupid non-news" — how glad I am not to live on your planet, where the closing of vast tracts of airspace for an indefinite period, with millions of people stranded, counts as banal.

Harry with sound files Language Log Eyjafjallaj. LanguageHat said: "Everyone has a right to their own crotchets and inconsistencies, but to try to impose them on the rest of humanity, or criticize those who don't go along with them, is a Bad Thing.

Why do you, in your capacity as a linguist, attempt to ridicule if not to purge anyone who does not march in lockstep with your anarchism?

Do you not see how childish such "descriptivist" nihilism is? Fascinating post and thread! Thanks, all. Even if I did skip over the 'puter stuff—it made my head hurt.

Two ells spelled out equals a tee and a cymbal tap spoken? Hell, that isn't linguistics, it's cryptography.

Every locale has its own special way of pronouncing itself. Here in San Francisco the locals like myself, and Sen. Dianne Feinstein say Samp'ncisco.

Then again our native born Austrian Governor's pronunciation for our state is always good for parody, Kal eee for neee yah, yes it is fery fery cherman.

April 18, am. On the other hand, I don't go around saying "Paree" when I'm speaking English…I don't say "the hoi polloi" myself because I know Greek and so it sounds weird to my ear, but I don't freak out when other people say it.

Troy S: I'm glad to hear Farsi isn't the only language with unpronounceable consonant clusters at the ends of words.

English is no slouch when it comes to consonant clusters. Even most native English speakers simplify it. It seems to me the 'bankers' have, seeing they seem to be living very comfortably in Iceland or the UK.

Regarding volcanoes and banking, reportedly there's already a joke about this. I'm not sure if the link works, so let me just copy from Iceland Review Online:.

Britain: Iceland are you crazy?!? Why did you send us volcanic ash? Our airspace has shut down. Original link. You might try "The Amazing Slow Downer" software from ronimusic.

I use it to slow down folk music I'm trying to learn by ear; it preserves the pitch. It might make some of the high-speed mp3s easier to understand.

As far as the sound files issue goes, just what is wrong with providing plain links? Nearly every system is capable of handling them correctly even if the developer hasn't licensed all the necessary patents to play the files back legally in the U.

I note that the RSS version of the post which is nornally the only one I read unless I want to comment has them, but unfortunately unconnected to where they are referenced in the text.

Writing as a user of yet another platform which will never have Flash. April 18, pm. Anyone calling Icelandic unpronounceable should be sentenced to a ten-years long hours-a-day course of Georgian.

So much for "CV is the easiest syllable structure to pronounce". It has also developed a homorganic stop in front of nasals inside a word.

A few examples, Finnish — NS. My brother, long resident in North America, asked me what tree that was in our back garden. I told him it's a pohutukawa.

Since we're seeing it every time we turn on the TV and the ash column rises to untold heights why not just call it "The Eyeful Tower"?

Given that we have cognates of all of the parts, as you say, why not call it Eyfellicle — ['ej. One of the reporters on the youtube video did pretty well with ['ejafatlaj kul].

They should be commended for a thoroughly pronounceable anglicisation. April 19, am. There's a discussion on Korean Wikipedia about how to render this name in hangul, the Korean alphabet.

Four years ago I came up with a proposal for rendering Icelandic names in hangul. It has no official recognition, although the National Institute of the Korean Language followed the scheme with one minor modification, which I follow for the current version of my proposal for the official hangul transcriptions of the names of Icelandic athletes at the Beijing Olympics.

People were trying to figure out how to render Eyjafjallajökull in hangul using my system, but got it wrong. In Revised Romanization of Korean, that is eiyapiadeullajekwideul.

The wi is in fact the standard approximation for the close front rounded vowel which is in fact an alternate pronunciation in Korean.

Currently the Wikipedia article uses an ad hoc rendering based on the IPA transcription. For users of the roman alphabet, this may be a pronunciation issue, but for others, it's a spelling issue as well.

And judging by the examples given on the discussion page, chaos is reigning in the Korean media with dozens of imaginative renderings of the Icelandic name.

No problem with pohutukawa. The fact that all the C's are different probably helped me a lot. Het lijkt dus of het woord eindigt op een t.

De discussie bij Language Log over de uitspraak van Eyjafjallajökull doet bijna evenveel stof opwaaien als de uitbarsting […].

Loved the discussion, but my eyes glossed over when it got to computer-speak. I'm glad it's not just me. Being on dial-up, I got the 'speakings' in buffered parts.

I live next to the Icelandic Consulate in my city and still missed that ending! My my! April 19, pm.

Gelernt habe ich auch etwas, denn dank dem Language Log weiss ich nun, wie man Eyjafjallajökull korrekt ausspricht.

So tönts halt, wenn man Wikinger […]. The BBC's famed pronunciation unit — of course — has its own advice.

NPR in the […]. April 20, am. This makes sense because "hoi" will not be recognized in English as an article in the same way that "le" or "el" will be.

I think it's better to put in the "the" than to leave it out. As for the actual topic of the thread, I don't think it's just the orthography that makes it hard to pronounce.

I count at least four different pronunciations. So quit worrying, even the Icelanders can't pronounce the name of their own mountain.

I am beginning to think it was named by a cat walking on a keyboard. Perhaps the world will come to speak of it in Potteresque terms — "the Mountain which must not be be named.

April 20, pm. I live in Owensboro, Kentucky USA , where, according to many of our fellow countrymen, we can't pronounce our own language, let alone someone else's.

The recordings I've heard of Icelanders saying it sound to me as though they're talking about a lady named Ava Layvitz.

I guess I just can't hear all the sounds with my southern ears. Curiously, a recording I found on the net of a Norwegian lady pronouncing it sounded pretty much as it's spelled if the j is like an English y.

I was wondering what a modern English cognate to Eyjafjallajökull would be, including a reflex of OE gicel, cognate to jökull, as the last element?

It would be a more elegant way of producing a pronounceable version for international use. Go here to start brushing up on your Icelandic volcano pronunciation of Eyjafjallajökull.

Share […]. April 22, am. Ogham stones of Wales. Foreign Accent Syndrome. Words for hens and chickens.

How to pronounce Eyjafjallajökull. Public profanity and presumptions of purity. The development of language, in cartoon form.

A short […]. April 22, pm. Andrew Woode " ic icle", as stated in the post. So, let's make that "Islefellicicle", shan't we?

Ooh, I want to play this game. Most instances of 'wick' in English place names of course mean 'dwelling' though and derive from Latin, not Old Norse… In any case, I propose 'Reekwick'.

A few comments to the typological convergencies around the Atlantic. Prestopping belongs to a number of innovations that have appeared in Scandinavian dialects on both sides of the Atlantic: Icelandic, Faroese, and southwestern dialects of Norwegian but only L is prestopped there, not N.

We do not know very much about the Norwegian-derived Scandinavian dialects in the British Isles but the little we know about Shetland Norn indicates that it was intermediate between Icelandic, Faroese and southwestern Norwegian and took part in those innovations.

Interestingly, the innovations in question are attested only in the late medieval period if memory serves right , long after the colonisation period, so they would seem to have spread through contacts across the ocean.

This indicates that the ocean was not such a great obstacle to communication as it is usually imagined to be — the same is true of the North Sea, by the way, where the languages around it have seen convergent developmental trends for centuries, especially in the Hanse age -, and contact continued after the emigration from Norway we do know that from historical sources, as well.

Also, the conservativity of Icelandic tends to be overestimated to an extent and in any way somewhat artifical, Old Icelandic always being present as a model much like Attic Greek to speakers of later forms of Greek and available as a source of constant renewal of archaic forms.

In any case, Icelandic pronunciation definitely has changed considerably thanks to the First Grammarian, we are informed about the phonology of 12th century Icelandic very well , and prestopping belongs to those distinctive changes.

Perhaps the feature was once more widespread in Scandinavia — I'm not sure if it belongs to the same "package" of innovations, and how old it is in Scandinavian.

While there does not seem to be direct evidence, from the aforementioned the probability that Norwegian-derived dialects in the British Isles had preaspiration too very high.

Interestingly, Einar Haugen mentions in his "The Scandinavian Languages" that Scandinavian survived in Caithness as long as the 15th century and on the Outer Hebrides as long as the 16th, curiously now the last stronghold of Scottish Gaelic.

The Hebrideans therefore have a case to make that they are really descendants of Vikings rather than Celts, and in any way it is striking that even though Scottish Gaelic is nowadays perceived as a complicated exotic language that nobody except perhaps a few freaks can be bothered to learn, it was still influential enough in the 16th century that the Hebrideans indeed did bother to learn it and even give up their native Scandinavian — presumably an "easier" language, although actually, Icelandic with its complex inflecting morphology including four nominal cases and various strange umlaut phenomena looks like a nightmare for the average speaker of Modern English.

In this light, the fact that Scottish Gaelic is distinctive by featuring preaspiration — especially on the islands, but it is widespread on the adjecent mainland as well — looks like a holdover from what is essentially a Scandinavian substrate rather than superstrate or adstrate.

I cannot remember reading anything about prestopping in any local dialect of Scottish Gaelic, but its occurrence in Manx surely makes you wonder.

To this point, I hadn't heard of prestopping in Cornish, I would be interested in learning more about it. As has been pointed out, both preaspiration and prestopping of nasals also occur in Sami languages not only in Northern Sami, by the way , and cannot be explained as an ancient feature there neither seems to be reconstructed for proto-Sami by Sammallahti.

The ultimate origin of these areal features is obscure; perhaps they go back to one of the substrate layers that Sami has assimilated while spreading through Fennoscandia, especially in the north and west curiously, however, modern Finnish, for which a Sami substrate has to be assumed, has the clusters "ht" and "hk" that sound very similar to preaspirated stops.

It is possible that at least some Scandinavian dialects have acquired the features from the substrate directly instead of from Sami.

In any event, this scenario would fit the distribution outlined so far quite well. My use of the word Atlantic was a little generous and potentially misleading; in fact, of course, the area in question covers only the shores of little more than the Norwegian Sea.

As for an Anglicisation of Eyjafjallajökull, I prefer Will Steed proposal farther above, Eyfellicle, to Islefellicicle, since icicle never means glacier.

Quite curious that speakers of English have such misgivings about the adaption of an Icelandic name when the Icelanders are famous for adapting foreign words and even translating them — even placenames, as has been pointed out.

Bad conscience on the part of English speakers regarding foreign and especially exotic and little-used languages, anyone?

It reminds me of the adjective Liverpudlian for Liverpool; I've always wondered about that one. On the other hand, the -pool is supposed to derive from Welsh pwll, so perhaps that's the explanation for the "dl".

Anyway, I wonder — does Icelandic have voiceless lateral fricatives or even affricates or only voiceless lateral approximants? There's even a gentleman who pointed out on the talk page for "Icelandic language" on Wikipedia that some Icelandic unaspirated stops sound glottalised to him at least he reported perceiving [k'] and wondered if they were ejectives, and even produced the abstract of a phonetic paper that seemed to confirm his impression.

I would like to know more about this — any phoneticians who can help? I wondered if the sounds in question might not be more similar to the Eastern Armenian voiceless unaspirated stops, which sound lightly glottalised to me but are said to be tense and not true ejectives.

I think it was in Fortson's Introduction to Indo-European linguistics where this was mentioned. There's also the fortis consonants in Swiss German which are suspected by some to be actually tense.

And of course the famous Korean stiff-voiced stops, although there it's not clear whether these are tense, stiff, or faucalised. April 23, am.

April 23, pm. April 24, am. Any others? April 25, am. April 25, pm. Regarding prestopping — it's found in several Australian languages both phonemically and sub-phonemically , and also in various languages in Amazonia, though there mostly with nasals.

April 27, am. This post was a lot of fun. I kept trying to nail the pronunciation, which put the word going through my head, which attached itself to a melody- so here's one anglicization of the name in song to the tune of "John Kanaka" -.

April 27, pm. May 1, pm. May 7, pm. May 15, am. Es bleibt also […]. May 16, pm. May 18, pm. For a standard English pronunciation of the name, I'd skip the t in the final tl.

There are some double Ls in Icelandic that are pronounced ll, and indeed the accusative form of Eyjafjallajökull is Eyjafjallajökul, so that rendering would be perfectly clear to an Icelandic speaker.

I think it's not as ear-bleedy as a mangled stop and lateral release would be, too. Log in or Sign up. Try to pronounce. Learn how to pronounce Eyjafjallajökull Eyjafjallajökull.

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Meanings for Eyjafjallajökull. Icelandic volcano. A volcano in Rekjavik I hope that is spelled right Iceland.

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Eyjafjallajökull Außprache Video

April 19, am. But I wasn't happy with that because I had a sneaking feeling that the double L might have some special pronunciation. Over Under support would be required for audio players than for static image display, or for the rendering of complex fonts. And I'm skeptical of some of the other vowel transcriptions as. The development of language, in cartoon form. LanguageHat said: "Everyone has a right to their own crotchets and inconsistencies, but to try to idea Pyramid Games about them on the rest of humanity, or criticize those who don't go along with them, is a Bad Thing.

I noticed msnbc has come up with 'Eyjafjöll Glacier' in place of Eyjafjallajökull. Seems very sensible to me.

In fact, I'm very impressed. It seems they went to the trouble of finding out what the nominative pl. Rural people may say the word a tad more slowly.

But 'the hyper-carefully-articulated performance' sounds unnatural to say the least. Scots Gaelic has preaspirated stops too; basically the consonants written with the symbols p t c are voiceless and preaspirated after a vowel word internally , and post aspirated initially.

The consonants written b d g are in fact voiceless and unaspirated. I don't know all that much about Icelandic but the consonantal system seems to be pretty similar in this respect.

Given the high degree of contact in mediaeval times between the Gaels and the Norsemen to say nothing of the high contribution of Gaels to the Icelandic settler population this might well be more than coincidence.

It may indeed be worth learning to say the name. The micro-particles of ash up in the jet stream could stay aloft for years and continue to hazard air transport, which didn't exist when Krakatoa blew.

The lateral affricates are pretty obvious to my ear. Apologies to Robert T. McQuaid, who suggested Eyajfjalla Glacier before I suggested something almost identical.

Suzanne, urban Dublin speech often shows similar effects parodied by fictional character Ross O'Carroll Kelly when he has working class Dubliners pronounce the name of the "Herald" as "Heddild".

And, of course, in the Viking era Dublin was an important Viking kingdom with strong links to York. All very speculative, but it's fun to speculate.

I can't think of counterexamples. I had been saying it "Ay-ya-fyall-uh-yikool". I'm glad to know the correct pronunciation although I can't quite get my tongue around it.

It sounds to me like "kuts" or "kutsch" in the last syllable in the recordings from the native Icelanders, so it must be an aspirated t.

This seems to be pronounced as a [t] with a lateral i. I'm glad we've given them something to laugh about.

They can laugh about our pronunciation while we laugh about their banking system. Dierk: "completely meaningless and unimportant 'news' … Stupid non-news" — how glad I am not to live on your planet, where the closing of vast tracts of airspace for an indefinite period, with millions of people stranded, counts as banal.

Harry with sound files Language Log Eyjafjallaj. LanguageHat said: "Everyone has a right to their own crotchets and inconsistencies, but to try to impose them on the rest of humanity, or criticize those who don't go along with them, is a Bad Thing.

Why do you, in your capacity as a linguist, attempt to ridicule if not to purge anyone who does not march in lockstep with your anarchism?

Do you not see how childish such "descriptivist" nihilism is? Fascinating post and thread! Thanks, all.

Even if I did skip over the 'puter stuff—it made my head hurt. Two ells spelled out equals a tee and a cymbal tap spoken?

Hell, that isn't linguistics, it's cryptography. Every locale has its own special way of pronouncing itself. Here in San Francisco the locals like myself, and Sen.

Dianne Feinstein say Samp'ncisco. Then again our native born Austrian Governor's pronunciation for our state is always good for parody, Kal eee for neee yah, yes it is fery fery cherman.

April 18, am. On the other hand, I don't go around saying "Paree" when I'm speaking English…I don't say "the hoi polloi" myself because I know Greek and so it sounds weird to my ear, but I don't freak out when other people say it.

Troy S: I'm glad to hear Farsi isn't the only language with unpronounceable consonant clusters at the ends of words. English is no slouch when it comes to consonant clusters.

Even most native English speakers simplify it. It seems to me the 'bankers' have, seeing they seem to be living very comfortably in Iceland or the UK.

Regarding volcanoes and banking, reportedly there's already a joke about this. I'm not sure if the link works, so let me just copy from Iceland Review Online:.

Britain: Iceland are you crazy?!? Why did you send us volcanic ash? Our airspace has shut down. Original link.

You might try "The Amazing Slow Downer" software from ronimusic. I use it to slow down folk music I'm trying to learn by ear; it preserves the pitch.

It might make some of the high-speed mp3s easier to understand. As far as the sound files issue goes, just what is wrong with providing plain links?

Nearly every system is capable of handling them correctly even if the developer hasn't licensed all the necessary patents to play the files back legally in the U.

I note that the RSS version of the post which is nornally the only one I read unless I want to comment has them, but unfortunately unconnected to where they are referenced in the text.

Writing as a user of yet another platform which will never have Flash. April 18, pm. Anyone calling Icelandic unpronounceable should be sentenced to a ten-years long hours-a-day course of Georgian.

So much for "CV is the easiest syllable structure to pronounce". It has also developed a homorganic stop in front of nasals inside a word.

A few examples, Finnish — NS. My brother, long resident in North America, asked me what tree that was in our back garden.

I told him it's a pohutukawa. Since we're seeing it every time we turn on the TV and the ash column rises to untold heights why not just call it "The Eyeful Tower"?

Given that we have cognates of all of the parts, as you say, why not call it Eyfellicle — ['ej. One of the reporters on the youtube video did pretty well with ['ejafatlaj kul].

They should be commended for a thoroughly pronounceable anglicisation. April 19, am. There's a discussion on Korean Wikipedia about how to render this name in hangul, the Korean alphabet.

Four years ago I came up with a proposal for rendering Icelandic names in hangul. It has no official recognition, although the National Institute of the Korean Language followed the scheme with one minor modification, which I follow for the current version of my proposal for the official hangul transcriptions of the names of Icelandic athletes at the Beijing Olympics.

People were trying to figure out how to render Eyjafjallajökull in hangul using my system, but got it wrong. In Revised Romanization of Korean, that is eiyapiadeullajekwideul.

The wi is in fact the standard approximation for the close front rounded vowel which is in fact an alternate pronunciation in Korean.

Currently the Wikipedia article uses an ad hoc rendering based on the IPA transcription. For users of the roman alphabet, this may be a pronunciation issue, but for others, it's a spelling issue as well.

And judging by the examples given on the discussion page, chaos is reigning in the Korean media with dozens of imaginative renderings of the Icelandic name.

No problem with pohutukawa. The fact that all the C's are different probably helped me a lot. Het lijkt dus of het woord eindigt op een t.

De discussie bij Language Log over de uitspraak van Eyjafjallajökull doet bijna evenveel stof opwaaien als de uitbarsting […]. Loved the discussion, but my eyes glossed over when it got to computer-speak.

I'm glad it's not just me. Being on dial-up, I got the 'speakings' in buffered parts. I live next to the Icelandic Consulate in my city and still missed that ending!

My my! April 19, pm. Gelernt habe ich auch etwas, denn dank dem Language Log weiss ich nun, wie man Eyjafjallajökull korrekt ausspricht.

So tönts halt, wenn man Wikinger […]. The BBC's famed pronunciation unit — of course — has its own advice. NPR in the […].

April 20, am. This makes sense because "hoi" will not be recognized in English as an article in the same way that "le" or "el" will be.

I think it's better to put in the "the" than to leave it out. As for the actual topic of the thread, I don't think it's just the orthography that makes it hard to pronounce.

I count at least four different pronunciations. So quit worrying, even the Icelanders can't pronounce the name of their own mountain.

I am beginning to think it was named by a cat walking on a keyboard. Perhaps the world will come to speak of it in Potteresque terms — "the Mountain which must not be be named.

April 20, pm. I live in Owensboro, Kentucky USA , where, according to many of our fellow countrymen, we can't pronounce our own language, let alone someone else's.

The recordings I've heard of Icelanders saying it sound to me as though they're talking about a lady named Ava Layvitz.

I guess I just can't hear all the sounds with my southern ears. Curiously, a recording I found on the net of a Norwegian lady pronouncing it sounded pretty much as it's spelled if the j is like an English y.

I was wondering what a modern English cognate to Eyjafjallajökull would be, including a reflex of OE gicel, cognate to jökull, as the last element?

It would be a more elegant way of producing a pronounceable version for international use. Go here to start brushing up on your Icelandic volcano pronunciation of Eyjafjallajökull.

Share […]. April 22, am. Ogham stones of Wales. Foreign Accent Syndrome. Words for hens and chickens. How to pronounce Eyjafjallajökull.

Public profanity and presumptions of purity. The development of language, in cartoon form. A short […]. April 22, pm. Andrew Woode " ic icle", as stated in the post.

So, let's make that "Islefellicicle", shan't we? Ooh, I want to play this game. Most instances of 'wick' in English place names of course mean 'dwelling' though and derive from Latin, not Old Norse… In any case, I propose 'Reekwick'.

A few comments to the typological convergencies around the Atlantic. Prestopping belongs to a number of innovations that have appeared in Scandinavian dialects on both sides of the Atlantic: Icelandic, Faroese, and southwestern dialects of Norwegian but only L is prestopped there, not N.

We do not know very much about the Norwegian-derived Scandinavian dialects in the British Isles but the little we know about Shetland Norn indicates that it was intermediate between Icelandic, Faroese and southwestern Norwegian and took part in those innovations.

Interestingly, the innovations in question are attested only in the late medieval period if memory serves right , long after the colonisation period, so they would seem to have spread through contacts across the ocean.

This indicates that the ocean was not such a great obstacle to communication as it is usually imagined to be — the same is true of the North Sea, by the way, where the languages around it have seen convergent developmental trends for centuries, especially in the Hanse age -, and contact continued after the emigration from Norway we do know that from historical sources, as well.

Also, the conservativity of Icelandic tends to be overestimated to an extent and in any way somewhat artifical, Old Icelandic always being present as a model much like Attic Greek to speakers of later forms of Greek and available as a source of constant renewal of archaic forms.

In any case, Icelandic pronunciation definitely has changed considerably thanks to the First Grammarian, we are informed about the phonology of 12th century Icelandic very well , and prestopping belongs to those distinctive changes.

Perhaps the feature was once more widespread in Scandinavia — I'm not sure if it belongs to the same "package" of innovations, and how old it is in Scandinavian.

While there does not seem to be direct evidence, from the aforementioned the probability that Norwegian-derived dialects in the British Isles had preaspiration too very high.

Interestingly, Einar Haugen mentions in his "The Scandinavian Languages" that Scandinavian survived in Caithness as long as the 15th century and on the Outer Hebrides as long as the 16th, curiously now the last stronghold of Scottish Gaelic.

The Hebrideans therefore have a case to make that they are really descendants of Vikings rather than Celts, and in any way it is striking that even though Scottish Gaelic is nowadays perceived as a complicated exotic language that nobody except perhaps a few freaks can be bothered to learn, it was still influential enough in the 16th century that the Hebrideans indeed did bother to learn it and even give up their native Scandinavian — presumably an "easier" language, although actually, Icelandic with its complex inflecting morphology including four nominal cases and various strange umlaut phenomena looks like a nightmare for the average speaker of Modern English.

In this light, the fact that Scottish Gaelic is distinctive by featuring preaspiration — especially on the islands, but it is widespread on the adjecent mainland as well — looks like a holdover from what is essentially a Scandinavian substrate rather than superstrate or adstrate.

I cannot remember reading anything about prestopping in any local dialect of Scottish Gaelic, but its occurrence in Manx surely makes you wonder.

To this point, I hadn't heard of prestopping in Cornish, I would be interested in learning more about it. As has been pointed out, both preaspiration and prestopping of nasals also occur in Sami languages not only in Northern Sami, by the way , and cannot be explained as an ancient feature there neither seems to be reconstructed for proto-Sami by Sammallahti.

The ultimate origin of these areal features is obscure; perhaps they go back to one of the substrate layers that Sami has assimilated while spreading through Fennoscandia, especially in the north and west curiously, however, modern Finnish, for which a Sami substrate has to be assumed, has the clusters "ht" and "hk" that sound very similar to preaspirated stops.

It is possible that at least some Scandinavian dialects have acquired the features from the substrate directly instead of from Sami.

In any event, this scenario would fit the distribution outlined so far quite well. My use of the word Atlantic was a little generous and potentially misleading; in fact, of course, the area in question covers only the shores of little more than the Norwegian Sea.

As for an Anglicisation of Eyjafjallajökull, I prefer Will Steed proposal farther above, Eyfellicle, to Islefellicicle, since icicle never means glacier.

Quite curious that speakers of English have such misgivings about the adaption of an Icelandic name when the Icelanders are famous for adapting foreign words and even translating them — even placenames, as has been pointed out.

Bad conscience on the part of English speakers regarding foreign and especially exotic and little-used languages, anyone? It reminds me of the adjective Liverpudlian for Liverpool; I've always wondered about that one.

On the other hand, the -pool is supposed to derive from Welsh pwll, so perhaps that's the explanation for the "dl".

Anyway, I wonder — does Icelandic have voiceless lateral fricatives or even affricates or only voiceless lateral approximants?

There's even a gentleman who pointed out on the talk page for "Icelandic language" on Wikipedia that some Icelandic unaspirated stops sound glottalised to him at least he reported perceiving [k'] and wondered if they were ejectives, and even produced the abstract of a phonetic paper that seemed to confirm his impression.

I would like to know more about this — any phoneticians who can help? I wondered if the sounds in question might not be more similar to the Eastern Armenian voiceless unaspirated stops, which sound lightly glottalised to me but are said to be tense and not true ejectives.

I think it was in Fortson's Introduction to Indo-European linguistics where this was mentioned. There's also the fortis consonants in Swiss German which are suspected by some to be actually tense.

And of course the famous Korean stiff-voiced stops, although there it's not clear whether these are tense, stiff, or faucalised.

April 23, am. April 23, pm. April 24, am. Any others? April 25, am. April 25, pm. Regarding prestopping — it's found in several Australian languages both phonemically and sub-phonemically , and also in various languages in Amazonia, though there mostly with nasals.

April 27, am. This post was a lot of fun. I kept trying to nail the pronunciation, which put the word going through my head, which attached itself to a melody- so here's one anglicization of the name in song to the tune of "John Kanaka" -.

April 27, pm. May 1, pm. May 7, pm. May 15, am. Es bleibt also […]. May 16, pm. May 18, pm. For a standard English pronunciation of the name, I'd skip the t in the final tl.

There are some double Ls in Icelandic that are pronounced ll, and indeed the accusative form of Eyjafjallajökull is Eyjafjallajökul, so that rendering would be perfectly clear to an Icelandic speaker.

I think it's not as ear-bleedy as a mangled stop and lateral release would be, too. May 27, pm.

But in my dialect, I would not be pre-aspirating any stops, though some Norwegian dialects do "thick l". On my sole visit to Iceland, I found that I could read most signs, but not understand much spoken Icelandic.

My reading of signs was benefiting from education on Old Norse — otherwise I probably would not have stood a chance.

Of course, Norwegian, Swedish and Danish are all the same language, although the Swedes can't spell and the Danes can't pronounce Keep up.

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